Robyn Ochs

Hello all, on September 10th, 2014, from 2-3pm EST, I’ll be giving a FREE webinar: Understanding Bisexuality: Challenging Stigma, Reducing Disparities, and Caring for Patients” that is hosted by the National LGBT Health Education Center, The Fenway Institute, Fenway Health. For those for whom this matters, CME/CEU credits are available. This presentation will be targeted toward health providers, but all are welcome.
Description:  Bisexual people face a number of health-care related disparities, including lower access to health insurance, higher rates of certain types of cancer, and higher prevalence of intimate partner violence. This webinar, featuring Robyn Ochs, Ed.M, a national speaker and teacher, and the editor of the 42-country anthology, Getting Bi: Voices of Bisexuals Around the World and the Bi Women Quarterly, will explore what it means to be bisexual, and will help providers best prepare to meet the needs of their bisexual patients. She will highlight disparities faced by bisexual people, and challenge negative messages and stigma that surround the bisexual community. Join us for this engaging and thought-provoking session!

Register online: https://fenwaylgbthealtheducation.webex.com

Hello all, on September 10th, 2014, from 2-3pm EST, I’ll be giving a FREE webinar: Understanding Bisexuality: Challenging Stigma, Reducing Disparities, and Caring for Patients” that is hosted by the National LGBT Health Education Center, The Fenway Institute, Fenway Health. For those for whom this matters, CME/CEU credits are available. This presentation will be targeted toward health providers, but all are welcome.

Description:
Bisexual people face a number of health-care related disparities, including lower access to health insurance, higher rates of certain types of cancer, and higher prevalence of intimate partner violence. This webinar, featuring Robyn Ochs, Ed.M, a national speaker and teacher, and the editor of the 42-country anthology, Getting Bi: Voices of Bisexuals Around the World and the Bi Women Quarterly, will explore what it means to be bisexual, and will help providers best prepare to meet the needs of their bisexual patients. She will highlight disparities faced by bisexual people, and challenge negative messages and stigma that surround the bisexual community. Join us for this engaging and thought-provoking session!

brigittefires:

robynochs:

If you identify as bi* and have had a negative experience with a health provider related to your sexual orientation, PLEASE tell me what happened — today. You can post here or else send me an email: robyn@robynochs.com. Thank you.

Can we get a reason why you’re asking this? What are you planning on doing with the information? What kind of identifying information will be included with it?

I am preparing a presentation on bisexual health for health providers (the first draft of which must finish by tomorrow). I was going to use my own (4) negative stories but then decided that it would be more powerful to have multiple voices. I’m using this information both to further educate myself, to make sure that the snippets I select are representative of other peoples’ experiences (not just my own) and to collet a pool of stories from which to draw as examples. No identifying information will be used. I hope this clarifies.

brigittefires:

robynochs:

If you identify as bi* and have had a negative experience with a health provider related to your sexual orientation, PLEASE tell me what happened — today. You can post here or else send me an email: robyn@robynochs.com. Thank you.

Can we get a reason why you’re asking this? What are you planning on doing with the information? What kind of identifying information will be included with it?

I am preparing a presentation on bisexual health for health providers (the first draft of which must finish by tomorrow). I was going to use my own (4) negative stories but then decided that it would be more powerful to have multiple voices. I’m using this information both to further educate myself, to make sure that the snippets I select are representative of other peoples’ experiences (not just my own) and to collet a pool of stories from which to draw as examples. No identifying information will be used. I hope this clarifies.

AND ON THE FLIP SIDE:If you identify as bi* and have had a POSITIVE experience with a health provider related to your sexual orientation, PLEASE tell me what happened — today. You can post here or else send me an email: robyn@robynochs.com. Thank you.

AND ON THE FLIP SIDE:
If you identify as bi* and have had a POSITIVE experience with a health provider related to your sexual orientation, PLEASE tell me what happened — today. You can post here or else send me an email: robyn@robynochs.com. Thank you.

If you identify as bi* and have had a negative experience with a health provider related to your sexual orientation, PLEASE tell me what happened — today. You can post here or else send me an email: robyn@robynochs.com. Thank you.

If you identify as bi* and have had a negative experience with a health provider related to your sexual orientation, PLEASE tell me what happened — today. You can post here or else send me an email: robyn@robynochs.com. Thank you.

It is my wish that every child be certain that they are loved. Please take time today to show the young people in your life how much you love them.

It is my wish that every child be certain that they are loved. Please take time today to show the young people in your life how much you love them.

kaniethiio:

"sexuality is a choice"

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"women wouldn’t get raped if they didn’t wear revealing clothes"

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"there are only two genders"

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"i’m not trying to be sexist/racist, but.."

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"a/bi/pansexuality isn’t real"

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"gay people shouldn’t have children"

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"i don’t want to be friends with a gay person, they could hit on me"

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"you can’t identify with the gender you want to be, only the one you were born with"

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(Source: eilizabeth, via bisexualturkeyclubsandwich)

#whatbilookslike

#whatbilookslike

Rock the Vote!

US Citizens: are you registered to vote yet? Exercise your rights. If you don’t, they might atrophy and fall off. 

WORDS MATTER
In mid-July, I was on the faculty and also a keynote speaker at Camp Pride 2014 (campuspride.org). For my keynote, rather than give a speech (I can do those too!),  I did a version of my Beyond Binaries program. Seventy campers completed the anonymous questionnaire that is part of this program.
One of the questions asked: “What identity word(s) words do you use to describe your sexual orientation?” Here’s how folks responded:
ace/queer (1)
bi (1)
bisexual (4)
bisexual or pansexual (1)
bisexual, demisexual (1)
bisexual, queer, pansexual (1)
confused (1)
Fluid bi sapiosexual (1)
fluid lesbian (1)
gay (18)
gay, queer, homosexual (1)
lesbian (5)
lesbian or homoflexible (1)
Lesbian/dyke (1)
lesbian/gay (2)
lesbian/gay/queer (1)
panromantic gray het/het?/Demisexual (1)
pansexual (2)
pansexual —> skoliosexual (1)
people lover, questioning (1)
Queer (10)
Queer, energy-sexual (1)
Queer, gay (3)
Queer, gay, lesbian, fluid (1)
queer, grey, asexual, kinky, nonmonogamous, pansexual
Queer/lesbian (1)
queer/pansexual (2)
Sexually fluid/Pansexual/Poly/Queer/mostly I say I fell of the sexual orientation wagon (1)
straight (3)
straight-ish (but usually straight) (1)
Note that 24 people wrote in more than one identity word when filling out the questionnaire.
Here’s something to think about: if these students had instead been filling out a multiple-choice questionnaire in which they were asked, “What is your sexual orientation?” with only “Straight” or “Lesbian” or “Gay” or “Bisexual” as options and where they were required to choose ONE of these in order to move to the next question, how would that have affected what researchers [thought they] could conclude?
Words matter. They can reveal or conceal a great deal about us.
With love,
Robyn

WORDS MATTER

In mid-July, I was on the faculty and also a keynote speaker at Camp Pride 2014 (campuspride.org). For my keynote, rather than give a speech (I can do those too!),  I did a version of my Beyond Binaries program. Seventy campers completed the anonymous questionnaire that is part of this program.

One of the questions asked: “What identity word(s) words do you use to describe your sexual orientation?” Here’s how folks responded:

ace/queer (1)

bi (1)

bisexual (4)

bisexual or pansexual (1)

bisexual, demisexual (1)

bisexual, queer, pansexual (1)

confused (1)

Fluid bi sapiosexual (1)

fluid lesbian (1)

gay (18)

gay, queer, homosexual (1)

lesbian (5)

lesbian or homoflexible (1)

Lesbian/dyke (1)

lesbian/gay (2)

lesbian/gay/queer (1)

panromantic gray het/het?/Demisexual (1)

pansexual (2)

pansexual —> skoliosexual (1)

people lover, questioning (1)

Queer (10)

Queer, energy-sexual (1)

Queer, gay (3)

Queer, gay, lesbian, fluid (1)

queer, grey, asexual, kinky, nonmonogamous, pansexual

Queer/lesbian (1)

queer/pansexual (2)

Sexually fluid/Pansexual/Poly/Queer/mostly I say I fell of the sexual orientation wagon (1)

straight (3)

straight-ish (but usually straight) (1)

Note that 24 people wrote in more than one identity word when filling out the questionnaire.

Here’s something to think about: if these students had instead been filling out a multiple-choice questionnaire in which they were asked, “What is your sexual orientation?” with only “Straight” or “Lesbian” or “Gay” or “Bisexual” as options and where they were required to choose ONE of these in order to move to the next question, how would that have affected what researchers [thought they] could conclude?

Words matter. They can reveal or conceal a great deal about us.

With love,

Robyn